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Girl's Insight: Women have right to choose birth control

Published: Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Updated: Thursday, March 15, 2012 17:03

 

Living in a free nation is something the United States prides on. But will our nation really be free if women aren’t able to even decide on their birth control?

If you aren’t up to speed, ladies, presidential candidate Rick Santorum is against birth control. I’m not here to tell you that you all should be on birth control. But it isn’t the president’s job to tell us what we can and cannot do. 

We live in a time of opportunity for women. We are able to work, go to school, have jobs and do anything and be anyone we want to be.  If having children is going to hold you back from doing the things you want to do, then maybe birth control is for you. If you have health issues, sometimes doctors even put women on birth control to help. Birth control is ultimately our choice as women. 

Sometimes it’s nice to think we have some control over the choices we make. Birth control is one of the things we as women can control.          

Religion plays a big part in contraceptives. Some religions believe abstinence is the only way. But we live in the United States, where we are able to believe whatever religion we want to, and the government does not force us to believe a universal religion.    

In a Fox News broadcast on March 4, Santorum tried to defend his views on birth control. 

He said: “I’m reflecting the views of the church I believe in. The issue is whether the government can force you to do things that are against your conscience, and that’s what we’ve been talking about on the road.”          

I believe he is doing just that. If Santorum is put into office, he will force us to do things that are against our conscience. He is also putting his religion into his campaign (who isn’t in the Republican race right now?). Religion should not play any part in the government.  We are free from a unified religion, so why are so many candidates playing the religion card to their favor in this race?   

Santorum brought up the fact that 99 percent of sexually active women have used birth control at some point. Santorum said he believes birth control is morally wrong, and employers should be able to opt out of covering it.             

This statistic proves that more people believe birth control is OK than not OK.  If 99 percent of women are OK with being on birth control, then why is birth control a problem? Just because Santorum and his wife have seven children doesn’t mean that every couple wants to bring seven children into this world.

This directly applies to Dixie State College students.  Students are some of the ones who make up this statistic.  College-aged females use birth control.  If the government is making it so it is controlled, we have lost our freedom of choosing.

Also, Santorum is a man.  Men should not be able to make decisions about stuff they don't understand  The female body and the male body are so different, and he has no idea what women go through.  He can’t tell us not to use birth control when he has no idea what birth is like. 

So Santorum, here is a call to action. Women don’t like being told what to do. Nor should we have to. If you want to win this race, then you need to leave religion out and leave the decision of birth control to us. 

And to readers (male and female) out there, we need to take a stand, and not vote Santorum (or any other candidate who pulls the stuff he does) into office.  Birth control is not something that needs to be messed with by the government.  Besides, we can make our own choices about birth control in a dress and heels any day.  Contact us at our Facebook page to tell us your thoughts about Rick Santorum’s view against birth control and how we can make a difference in the upcoming presidential election.

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